At South Charlotte Dermatology we treat a wide variety of conditions that may be effecting you, or someone you know.  As we are a new practice we welcome your referrals.  We are accepting new patients.  We have same day appointments as well is evening and weekend hours for your convenience.  We look forward to exceeding our expectations.  Your business is very important to us.

 

Acne

Acne is a skin condition which has plugged pores (blackheads and whiteheads), inflamed pimples (pustules), and deeper lumps (nodules). Acne occurs on the face, as well as the neck, chest, back, shoulders, and upper arms. Although most teenagers get some form of acne, adults in their 20’s, 30’s, 40’s, or even older, can develop acne. Often, acne clears up after several years, even without treatment. Acne can be disfiguring and upsetting to the patient. Untreated acne can leave permanent scars; these may be treated by your dermatologist in the future. To avoid acne scarring, treating acne is important.

Actinic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses (AKs) are considered the earliest stage in the development of skin cancer. They are common lesions of the epidermis (outermost layer of the skin), and are caused by long-term exposure to sunlight. AKs are most likely to appear after age 40, however, in geographic areas with year-round high-intensity sunlight such as Florida and southern California, AKs may be found in persons as young as the teens and twenties. Half of all older, fair-skinned persons who live in hot, sunny areas have AKs. The most significant predisposing factor to AKs is fair skin and long-term sun exposure

Allergic Contact Rashes

Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by a reaction to substances called allergens that come into contact with your skin. In susceptible people, these contact allergens can cause itching, redness, and blisters that is known as allergic contact dermatitis.

Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis

The terms “eczema” or “dermatitis” are used to describe certain kinds of inflamed skin conditions including allergic contact dermatitis and nummular dermatitis. Eczema can be red, blistering, oozing, scaly, brownish, or thickened and usually itches. A special type is called atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema.

Herpes Simplex

The herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes blisters and sores around the mouth, nose, genitals, and buttocks, but they may occur almost anywhere on the skin. HSV infections can be very annoying because they may reappear periodically. The sores may be painful and unsightly. For chronically ill people and newborn babies, the viral infection can be serious, but rarely fatal. There are two types of HSV — Type 1 and Type 2.

Herpes Zoster

Herpes zoster, also known as shingles or zoster, is a viral infection caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox. Anyone who has had chicken pox can develop herpes zoster. The virus remains dormant (inactive), in certain nerve cells of the body, and when it reactivates it causes zoster. About 20 percent of those people who have had chicken pox will get zoster. Most people get zoster only once.

Hives

Urticaria (hives) are localized, pale, itchy, pink wheals (swellings) that can burn or sting. They may occur singularly or in groups on any part of the skin; they are part of an allergic reaction and are very common. Approximately 10-20 percent of the population will have at least one episode in their lifetime. Most episodes of hives disappear quickly in a few days to a few weeks. Occasionally, a person will have them for many months or years. New hives may develop as old ones fade. Hives can vary in size form as small as a pencil eraser to as large as a dinner plate, and may join to form even larger swellings.

Moles

Everyone has moles, sometimes 40 or more. Most people think of a mole as a dark brown spot, but moles have a wide range of appearance. At one time, a mole in a certain spot on the cheek of a woman was considered fashionable. Some were even painted on. These were called “beauty marks.” However, not all moles are beautiful. They can be raised from the skin and very noticeable, they may contain dark hairs, or they may be dangerous.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is an inflammatory disorder of the skin in which activation of T lymphocytes results in release of cytokines that leads to proliferation of keratinocytes. In normal skin, the cells of the epidermis are regenerated every 28 days, while in psoriatic skin epidermis is regenerated every two to four days.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin disease that causes redness, papules, and swelling on the face. Often referred to as “adult acne,” rosacea frequently begins as a tendency to flush or blush easily. It may progress to persistent redness in the center of the face that may gradually involve the cheeks, forehead, chin, and nose. The eyes, ears, chest, and back may also be involved. With time, small blood vessels and tiny pimples begin to appear on and around the reddened area; however, unlike acne, there are no blackheads.

Scabies

Scabies is caused by a tiny mite that has infested humans for at least 2,500 years. It is often hard to detect, and causes a fiercely, itchy skin condition. Dermatologists estimate that more than 300 million cases of scabies occur worldwide every year. The condition can strike anyone of any race or age, regardless of personal hygiene. The good news is that with better detection methods and treatments, scabies does not need to cause more than temporary distress.

Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a skin condition resulting from loss of pigment which produces white patches. Any part of the body may be affected. Usually both sides of the body are affected. Common areas of involvement are the face, lips, hands, arms, legs, and genital areas.

Warts

Warts are non-cancerous skin growths caused by a viral infection in the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts are usually skin-colored and feel rough to the touch, but they can be dark, flat and smooth. The appearance of a wart depends on where it is growing.

Hair Loss

Hair has been called our “crowning glory.” Society has placed a great deal of social and cultural importance on hair and hairstyles. Unfortunately, many conditions, diseases, and improper hair care result in excessive hair loss. People who notice their hair shedding in large amounts after combing or brushing, or whose hair becomes thinner or falls out, should consult a dermatologist. With correct diagnosis, many people with hair loss can be helped.

Nails

The nails serve many important functions. They help us pick up and manipulate objects, and they protect and support the tissues of the fingers and toes. Nails can be very attractive. Women, more often than men, place a great deal of importance on how their nails look and spend a considerable amount of time and money on them. Nails reflect an individual’s personal and health habits – good or bad. Aside from their cosmetic appeal, nails serve many important functions. Most importantly, nails often reflect our general state of health.

Nail Fungi

The most common infection of the nails is caused by an organism called fungus. Fungal nail infections, or onychomycosis, are more common on the toenails than the fingernails and affects about 12% of all Americans. It occurs in approximately 25% of people at age 40, and 40% of older people. Onychomycosis tends to run in families because of an inherited tendency, but not everyone is susceptible. It is rare in children unless one or both parents are infected.